Give Thanks

I know it’s a little late for Thanksgiving and Christmas is in full swing, but I wanted to share a few glimpses into our family Thanksgiving celebration! Between work and school, I didn’t have time to help prepare any food for the feast, so instead I was given full jurisdiction over the table decor and design. Just the kind of creative fun I needed!

Early on Thanksgiving morning, I bundled up in snowpants and winter coat, along with hat and gloves, to go search out some red berry bushes (I still have no idea what they’re actually called). I found some on a stone wall a few minutes from home, and gathered an armful of the bright branches.

At the house, I began decorating the table. First, a red damask-style tablecloth. Next, a thrifted wooden candelabra, with red and white tapers. I then filled vases and jars with red berries and faux greenery, along with a few harvest pieces. I had a few colorful gourds leftover from my fall decor, as well as a hardy little pumpkin. These gathered around the candelabra, along with more red berries.

I then laid out the plates and silverware and glassware, along with some hand-painted place cards for each guest. These were really fun and simple to make - just a rectangle of cardstock, folded in half and placed on each plate.

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Next, I turned my attention to the kitchen island (my parents have an open-concept dining room and kitchen). The island would hold a selection of appetizers, so I wanted to be sure it had its own share of decor. A vase of more greenery and berries adorned the space next to a tray of goodies.

Last, I hung a little hand-painted sign next to the refrigerator on the end of a tall bookcase. Just a little reminder to give thanks, continually and daily, for all that we have. (Pro-tip: Goodwill sometimes has cheap clipboards, and they make wonderful displays for artwork!).

I hope you enjoyed this little sneak peek into our day’s festivities! Creating a beautiful and welcoming space is so rewarding, especially when friends and family are gathering to celebrate together. On to Christmas!

International Textiles

Over the past few weeks I've had the opportunity to travel, so to speak, through textiles! A new friend who was a missionary in both Papua New Guinea and the tiny island nation of Yap shared some beautiful pieces she brought back with her. 

First up, the bilum bag.

These bags from Papua New Guinea are very similar to crochet, but they are made of yarn or fiber that is untwisted and re-twisted by hand, and knotted into a mesh fabric using a tool made from an umbrella spoke. They can range in size from large enough to carry a toddler in to small enough for a little project or some produce. The larger bags are carried hung from one's forehead, or hung around one's neck to carry in front, leaving the hands free in both cases. 

Traditional Bilum Bag

The one my friend gave me was made from twisted grass fibers, and dyed in the center with yellow to create a beautiful stripe. (You all know how I feel about yellow!). The style of this bag is more openwork, while some bilum bags are much more tightly knotted from colorful acrylic yarn to create a dense fabric. You can see more examples of bilum bags here, here, and here. The best part? Australia has funded a project to help women in Papua New Guinea increase their income through their bilum bags. You can read more about this project here

Next, the lavalava skirt.

These skirts, made in the tiny Micronesian nation of Yap, are tightly woven from handmade looms using very thin fibers akin to single embroidery threads. The fabric is very dense and sturdy, but with plenty of drape. Worn like a sarong, they are wrapped around the hips and tucked in at the side, allowing the fringe to drape down in the front.

Traditional Lavalava Skirt
Traditional Lavalava Skirt
Traditional Lavalava Skirt

There's even a sort of ritual or routine to fold these skirts properly - it was fun to learn how. The colorwork and intricacy of these skirts is just incredible, and they are woven completely by hand! The looms used to weave these skirts are similar to belt looms, and they are usually made from found objects. The most interesting loom my friend saw was one crafted from the parts of a plane that crashed during World War II. You can read more about lavalava skirts here and here

I'm really happy to own textiles made on the other side of the world, and be able to enjoy their beauty and intricacy in my own home. It's incredible to me how various cultures create cloth, and what they make with the cloth they've woven. Even the colorwork - it's so special. I hope you enjoyed this little international journey through textiles with me!